Demographics & Economics

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Estimated 2006 Household Incomes

Table 10 and the associated chart show that the household incomes in the study area are skewed lower than the rest of the City.  Table 11 shows a particularly strong distinction between the two areas in terms of average and median household incomes.  Yet on a per capita basis, the incomes vary by less than 2%.  In addition, Figure 3 shows that in 1999, the median income for study area fell in the same range as much of downtown Troy.  According to US Census Bureau data, median 2005 income for a two-person family in New York State was $50,367 +/- $543, which is more than twice the 2006 results for the study area.

The data for average household size is slightly lower in the study area compared to the rest of the City.  This is consistent with the marital statistics shown in Table 8.  Having a higher proportion of single person households in the study area could raise the per capita income average, but it appears that more than one factor is at play.  According to US Census Bureau data, poverty thresholds for 2006 by size of family and number of related children under 18 years was $10,488 for one person under 65 years ($9,669 for one person 65 years and over).  For two persons, household poverty levels ranged between $12,186 and $13,896 and for three persons, household poverty levels ranged between $15,769 and $16,242.  Figure 4 shows that between 24.5 to 29.5% of the study area population lived at or near the poverty level in 1999.

 

 

 

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