Demographics & Economics

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Table 17 shows that the majority of housing units in both the study area and the City of Troy are more than single family residences.  In fact, single family residences represent fewer than 12% (less than 1 in 8) of the housing units in the study area and fewer than 20% (less than 1 in 5) in the City.  The study area also has an appreciably lower percentage of detached single family residences (8.95%) compared to the City (17.02%).  Nearly 80% of the housing units in the study area are contained in structures with between 2 to 19 units.  This data, in conjunction with the small percent of detached single family residences reflect that the study area has long been a densely populated segment of the City.  The data lacks fidelity for categorizing structures with between 3 to 19 units.  However, based on observation along the Upper Congress Street corridor, it is likely that the majority of structures that fall in this category have between 3 and 6 units. 

 

These data contrast sharply with the rest of the country.  According to the 2000 US Census data, 60.3% of housing units in the country are single family houses, not attached to any other structures.  Nationally, New York State and Hawaii are tied for having the highest percent of their homes in structures with 5 or more units (32.5%).

Similar to other housing statistics, Table 18 shows that the range in value of owner-occupied housing is wider in the City compared to the study area, however, the median values vary by less than 3%.  Nearly two-thirds of the house values in the study area and the City fall between $100,000 and $200,000. 

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