A Brief History of the Mount Ida Neighborhood - Transition

[Figure 24] As a clear indication of the acknowledged shift in the type of companies that might find Troy an attractive mate, the booklet mentioned neither Mount Ida nor the Poesten Kill in its thirty pages.  The Manning Paper Company was the only manufacturer still employing large numbers in the neighborhood, and its loyalty to the area was soon to be severely tested.  Among the most ironic of the 1938 claims were that “extremes in weather are a rarity” and “danger of flood damage in Troy is negligible.”* 

Within four months of the pamphlet’s release, Troy was struck by the remnants of a hurricane that had ravaged Long Island and parts of New England.  The Poesten Kill was particularly hard hit by the ensuing flood, and most of the buildings left along the stream were scattered by the surge as the creek ranged far above its banks.**  The “Old Hollow Road” at the base of Cypress was washed away, and houses along the east side of the stream were undermined and subsequently slid into the water.***  The ancient mills along the Poesten Kill fared no better, and the abrupt cleanup that followed all but erased evidence of the area’s rich industrial past.****   The hurricane was the final blow to any hopes for an industrial revival on Mount Ida.

In 1891 James Arthur Weise, Troy’s most authoritative and prolific historian, had predicted that “The growth of Troy in the next hundred years will no doubt exceed that of the last century.”*****

* Pp. 17 and 18.

** “Torrential Rains Menace Property, Troy Area Places,” The Times Record, September 22, 1938, pp. 1-5.

*** “Washed Away By Raging Poestenkill,” The Times Record, September 23, 1938, pp. 1, 4.

**** Merritt Abrash, “Institute on Industrial Archaeology,” Journal of Field Archaeology, Vol. 1, No. 3 (1974), 237.

***** Troy’s One Hundred Years, 419

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