History

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Figure 21: An 1880 engraving of the Poesten Kill Gorge/Falls.  Artists tended to depict the gorge as pastoral and tranquil, but when subjected to prolonged rains or heavy doses of snow melt, the Poesten Kill could be dangerous.  1891 newspaper accounts speak of a James Smith further up the stream who was “found dead standing in mud up to his neck, horribly mangled, about a half mile from a barn in which he was last seen alive” (Image from Nathaniel B. Sylvester, History of Rensselaer County, 175.  Account of James Smith’s death from “Two Drowned,” Troy Daily Times, August 28, 1891, p. 3)

Figure 22:  The cover of The Reporter, a publication produced by the Troy Chamber of Commerce in association with 1908’s “Troy Week.”  The City of Troy had attempted to boost its slumping economic fortunes by luring businesses with a campaign touting the area’s quality of life.  Miss Troy, the personification of the city, holds the bounty of her late manufacturing prowess within the folds of her dress.  By the time this brochure was printed, the Collar City was no longer a major producer of most of the items.  Troy’s population would peak in 1910, and the city would subsequently experience a gradual but constant loss of residents (Courtesy of the New York State Library, Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections).

 

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