History

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Figure 7: Detail from an 1845 City Engineer’s Map of Troy by S.A. Beers.  The city’s eastern limits were aligned north to south with Ida Falls, an indication of the early importance of this natural feature for both industry and recreation.  The area to the east of the falls was part of the town of Brunswick, annexed shortly after this map’s advent (Courtesy of the Troy Public Library).

Figure 8:  Detail of Mount Ida from an 1873 Sampson and Davenport Map of Troy.  The map interestingly reveals the location of St. Peter’s College, even though this structure had been destroyed during its construction by a landslide on St. Patrick’s Day 1859.  Rev. Peter Havermans vowed to rebuild the college, but he could not raise the necessary funds and the project failed.  Between 1836 and 1859 at least six separate landslides claimed portions of the west side of Mount Ida, the most destructive moving a large part of the land 500 feet away from the hill and damaging many homes, barns and outbuildings along Washington Street.  The catastrophes killed twenty-two people and destroyed at least as many dwellings (Courtesy of the Troy Public Library).

Figure 9: An early 1870s photograph of the William P. Kellogg factory on the south side of Congress Street near Fifteenth.  Kellogg produced percussion caps and currycombs for the Union Army during the Civil War and expanded his machining business in the aftermath to include such items as blinds, doors and sashes.  The above image includes at least twenty-four children, a number of women in hoop skirts, and three African-American men (Courtesy of Kevin M. O’Connor).

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