History

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Figure 15:  Detail of an 1877 lithograph of Troy.  Mount Ida was dominated by the estate of Henry Warren, whose “cottage” (bottom center) was reportedly designed by Alexander Jackson Davis.  The image depicts upper Congress Street as Troy’s horizon, with the Second Baptist Church (now Mount Ida Baptist Church) as the final outpost on the way out of the city.  It was the point of departure for the Hoosac Tunnel and Boston as well as West Sand Lake and other points southeast.  The area was already a significant channel for people and goods moving in and out of the city (Courtesy of the New York State Library, Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections).

Figure 16:  Hand-colored photo of the interior of the F.W. Farnam Steam Fire-Engine Company, Number 5, about 1880.  This firehouse replaced the old Lafayette Engine Company, Number 10 in 1876.  It was located on the south side of Congress Street, immediately west of the Church of the Ascension.  The 1871 Button and Son steamer is on the right.  The 1876 firehouse, the new 1885 Button steamer, the Free Church of the Ascension and the Farnam Institute were all outright gifts of Franklin W. Farnam (1812-1888).  Farnam was a knitting goods manufacturer with a mill on the Poesten Kill east of the current Pawling Avenue Bridge (Courtesy of the Rensselaer County Historical Society). 

 

 

 

 

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