History

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Figure 17:  Detail of an image of (l to r) the Second Baptist Church, a private wood-framed residence, and the Free Church of the Ascension (Episcopal).  This photo was taken between 1871 and 1876.  The advent of these two substantial churches and their permanent congregations signaled an important shift in the city’s perception of Mount Ida.  By 1875, the neighborhood had become self-sufficient, with most all the amenities requisite for the modern Victorian standard of living.  The wooden house was replaced by three brick row houses in the 1890s.  The steeple of the re-named Mount Ida Baptist Church is long gone, as are the dormer windows of the Free Church of the Ascension (Courtesy of the New York State Library, Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections).

Figure 18:  The Troy and West Sand Lake Trolley, about 1880.  Horses began pulling the streetcars up the Congress Street incline in the spring of 1866.  This new form of transport not only allowed residents of Mount Ida to conduct their business in downtown Troy, but it also allowed city residents to visit the Poesten Kill Gorge.  Ida Falls was a popular destination for daily outings from the city well into the twentieth century.  In 1880 a family of four could ride the streetcar roundtrip from River Street to Mount Ida for ten cents.  The journey was especially popular on spring and summer evenings when the open cars caught the breezes and provided some relief from the sometimes stifling heat of the city (Courtesy of the Fred B. Abele Transportation History Collection, New York State Library, Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections). 

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