History

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Figure 19: The original Mount Ida Burial Grounds (also referred to as the Troy Cemetery as well as the Old Troy Burial Grounds) about 1880.  The house in the bottom left of the image stood at the corner of Walnut and Marshall Streets.  Stephen Van Rensselaer deeded the property to the city in 1814 for burial purposes.  Even though the first burial was the same year, by 1886 Arthur James Weise could refer to the property as a “neglected grave-yard.”  Many of the bodies were exhumed in 1903 in conjunction with the construction of Prospect Park and interred in the Mount Ida Cemetery on the east side of Pawling Avenue (Courtesy of the Rensselaer County Historical Society).

Figure 20:  An 1881 engraving of the Troy Malleable Iron Works.  Not all industry in the area was along the Poesten Kill or even on the south side of Congress Street.  George Harrison and William Knight established this major foundry in 1850 between Marshall and Congress Streets, in what became the center of the residential district on both sides of Fourteenth Street.  Note the first St. Francis de Sales Church in the top left corner and the horse-drawn trolley along Congress Street in the foreground (From: Arthur James Weise, The City of Troy and Its Vicinity, 302).

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